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the first-ever televised debate richard nixon chose to wear no makeup. with a 5:00 shadow he looked sweaty and uncomfortable compared to the tanned, relaxed john f. kennedy. then voters heard the impatient sighs of al gore. it was clear by the microphones while george w. bush was talking. it played into a larger narrative into the campaigns. it re-inforced what the audience thought about the candidates. >> when gore sighed endlessly and moaned during the debate and we saw that on television, it just emphasized the idea that he was arrogant and condescending, something people were already concerned about. when nixon was sweating, there was some sense that he was already shifty and there was an anxiety in his soul as well as his body. >> that's what the question in this campaign is about. >> reporter: in a later debate that year gore appeared to invade the personal space of bush. >> i believe i can. >> reporter: a move which made him look awkward compared to his relaxed opponent. in 1992 george h.w. bush was caught twice by cameras glancing at his watch during a town hall debate with voters
-- for example, think about president reagan, he was running against the catastrophic effects of nixon's wage on price controls lasting up to 1980 and carter. the "new york times," i have to remind you, the "new york times" on the eve of the election between reagan and carter had it too close to call. lou: the third debate? >> that is right. lou: i know it's right. up next, governor romney trailing in the polls, but does history show come from behind wins are possible? as we disused, there -- discussed, there is history here. we'll have the report. are taxpayer dollars -- they call it art, but looks like obscenity to me, but there we are. we'll look at the ways in which the obama administration expresses religious sensitivity and tolerance and other ways in which had does not seem to give much of a damn. we'll talk about catth catholic league president, bill don hue and karen handle here in just moments. [ female announcer ] they can be enlightening. hey, bro. or engaging. conversations help us learn and grow. at wells fargo, we believe you can never underestimate the power of a conversation.
1972. the raging unpopular war in vietnam consumed the bitter campaign battle between president nixon and george mcgovern. suddenly on october 26th, 12 days before the election, vietnam negotiator henry kissinger made a surprise declaration believed to cement nixon's front-runner status. >> we believe that peace is at hand. >> reporter: it was the first so-called october surprise. a late in the game campaign event with a significant impact on the election. >> in order to win re-election for nixon in 1972, he needed to end the vietnam war. and this was sort of the definetive statement. >> reporter: the most famous october surprise was in 1980. 52 u.s. hostages held in iran were not released before the election despite president carter's efforts. instead they were freed as soon as rsh was inaugurated setting off democratic suspicion never proven that reagan elm sears back chanld with iran in delaying freeing the hostages and denied the troubled carter campaign a huge pre-election boost. >> it fed into the whole dynamic of the 1980 race in that jimmy carter was a stumbling ineffective pr
another president initiated it. who was that? "a" dwight eisenhower, richard nixon, herbert hoover. who was on the blueprint. that is right. eisenhower. that was an easy one. i read that extensively and killing kennedy comes out on tuesday. thank you very much with putting up with me. 1998 bill clinton found also in one of the biggest presidential scandals the country had ever seen. >> i want you to listen to me. i'm going say this again. i did not have sexual relations with that woman. i never told anybody to lie, not a single time, never. >> bill: because of the scandal, bill clinton became a second u.s. president to be impeached. who was the first? nixon, polk, martin van burren. >> that is correct. andrew johnson. he escaped by how many votes? >> one. >> a very good. >> bill: onee would have been toast. alien extradition acts is most controversial u.s. laws of their time. >> in 1798 french warships seized american vessels trading with england. frightened by the possibility of invasion they passed the alien and sedition act the power to deport any alien and made citizens who criticiz
. >>> a dramatic rescue in portland, maine, caught on cell phone camera. 84-year-old ursula nixon lost control of her car on friday, and some good samaritans braved the cold waters to pull her out. police say nixon sped through a stop sign, two fences and an oceanfront barrier before she ended up in the portland harbor. she's in fair condition. several of her rescuers were treated for hypothermia. >>> a 10-year-old boy in philadelphia is in big trouble. see that white van crashing into those cars right there. police say on sunday he stole it and he's the one behind the wheel. surveillance camera shows him getting out and trying to run away, but someone stops him. police say the boy saw the keys on the rear door and went on a bief joyride. he wasn't just slapped on the wrist either. he's expected to be charged with auto theft. >>> in hong kong, an investigation into a deadly ferry collision is under way. at least 36 people were killed. dozens injured. a boat filled with revelers slammed into the ferry. more than 100 people were rescued and sent to hospitals. one person is still missing. report
is just three days away. not the first debate ever. the first was 1960 with kennedy/nixon. mitt romney and barack obama will be live from denver. it is serious business, but there are also two games being played here. there's the expectations game the two campaigns have been playing. then there's the game of dodge ball. that's what we're talking about this morning. joining me now live is todd rogers. he's an assistant professor at harvard's kennedy school. thank you very much for joining us. >> hi, gary. thanks for having me. >> the artful dodge. what is that all about? >> so with a collaborator here at harvard, we've been doing psychological experiments to understand how its they politicians manage to evade questions without being detected so we've run a series of these experiments where viewers are randomly assigned to one of three conditions. in one condition they watch a video where a moderator asks a question that say as what will you do about the universal health care problem in the world. the politician said, i'll glad you asked me that. we need universal health care. we then sp
bebe? >> this is another request from president nixon who started this stuff when he went on the old show called laugh-in and spoke the immortal words -- sock it to me. there is a freeze frame on internet that shows president and mrs. obama all smily but when elizabeth hasselbeck starts to ask a question the president's face gets very grim, and michelle obama's fay is like this. >> rick: you were watching very closely. [ laughter ] >> rick: word on friday that the president did have a conversation late in the week with the prime minister, the media has covered the apparent approximate between the two world leaders, what do you think? >> this is longest running soap opera versus obama. bb versus obama. he had to do something to make the damage less damaging. he did not 6 the 13 bilaterals he had the last time he was in new york. obama didn't have any. media is saying that is perfectly okay because the salesman running for office. that is explanation but to accept that on its face is i think a bit not right. >> rick: world leaders speak their minds and how the media reacts. >> as presi
's got to score. >> there was a time between the famous kennedy-nixon tapes that there were no televised debates. why are they considered so vital now? >> well, the kennedy-nixon debates created so much attention in 1960. many people think that's why ted kennedy won. if you recall ford made famously the gap that -- and then certainly by 1980, ronald reagan was very behind in the polls was just able to tidal wave over jimmy carter with quips like there you go again in a sort of staged format. since 1980, they have become part of the american landscape. >> the "new york times" recently wrote about this debate prep and the president of the united states is an awesome figure merely to share the platform with him on equal terms is the gain in stature, good performance will be gauged even better. why would any president agree to participate in an event that ultimately -- the -- because it's become now a demand, president obama suddenly bailed on debates. then, you know, he would be seeming like a poor sport. and also these debates are agreed upon long before the fall season, they're everything
bequest from president nixon, when he went on "laugh-in", and uttered the words, "sock it to me? and there's an internet frame, the president and mrs. obama light and bubbly and smiling and the others are speaking with em this. but when elizabeth hasselbeck, the one conservative on the view starts to ask a question, the president face gets very grim, almost condescending and michelle obama's face is like this. >> you were watching very closely. >> so. >> judy, word on friday that the president did in fact have a conversation late in the week with president obama, the way that the media has covered the apparent problems between the two world leaders, what do you think? >> this is the longest running soap opera in foreign policy, bb versus obama. of course he had to do something to try to make it-- make the damage less, less damaging than it was. he did not have the 13 bilaterals that he had the last time in new york. obama did not have any and the media are saying that's perfectly okay because the man is running for office. that's an explanation, about you to accept that on its face is i th
the nixon administration by publishing the secret penalty gone papers on the vietnam war and faced criticism from his own profession after giving an op-ed to welcome sapphire who went onto win a pulitzer. his son now runs the paper and company. he was 86. media monitor is next. >>> time for the media monitor. a look at the hits and errors in the news business. >>> roger simon got attention for his political column this week because he had paul ryan reportedly using a toxic nickname for his running mate, let ryan be ryan and let the stench be the stench. suddenly you could smell that story in lots of places. >> yes. the stench. that is what paul ryan is actually calling mitt romney according to politico. >> "the new york times" columnist blogged this is bad behavior, you're supposed to wait until it is over before you do this kind of thing. says it demonstrates the toxic press is in ryan's head, except that roger, well, made that up. it was a bit of satire, subtle enough that politico had to add an editor's note later saying some readers were confused that this was satire, which means it was
that he gave while richard nixon continuously lost ground thereafter. the story goes that it was kennedy's tan, his youthful look that won him the first televised debate. do you think that's the full story? >> i think that's part of an lore. i think much more was this. before that first debate john kennedy was thought of as a young, not very distinguished absentee senator, junior senator from massachusetts debating against the vice-president of the united states who had stood up to kruschev. this marvelous debater. kennedy was able to not only match nixon but exceed him. people began to think of him as a possible president. >> are debates necessary for the democratic process? have the best debaters proven to be then the best presidents? >> they have in one sense. and that is one of the most important things you want from a president is someone who if he has to make a tough decision can go to americans and say, this may be unpopular with you but let me try to explain it, explain why it's the right thing to do. if a president doesn't have that he's not going to serve very well and the deba
to have you here. >> good morning. >> martha: let's start with the classic, which is the nixon-kennedy debate. and folks who watched it on television clearly thought jack kennedy was the winner, but that wasn't necessarily the response of people who didn't get to see it. >> yeah. there was actually four debates. it was the first presidential debate series. people that listened to it on the radio, which was the majority of radios, thought nixon won on substance. people who watched, thought kennedy did. kennedy was tanned and had make-up on. nixon did not. he came out of the hospital a few days earlier. he was gone. it showed. he sweat a lot and the impression people left with was he was shifty can kennedy was in command. >> martha: he refused make-up apparently, which is probably a candidate made that mistake. let's look at carter-reagan, a fascinating one to watch. we have a little bit of sound from it. we want to get your thoughts on that. let's play that. >> governor reagan, as a matter of fact, gone his political career campaigning around this nation against medicare. >> the
the first kennedy/nixon debate where kennedy defied the expectations that he was a rich light weight playboy and won the debate as much as nixon lost it. in 1980 reagan defies expectations because people -- there was a character that the carter campaign created of him of a nuclear cowboy. it is none of those things. >> carter also was asking about nuclear war. >> what romney has to do is forget the nonsense about it being about himself. if you are a 65-year-old man you are not comfortable in your own skin you never will be. he has to talk to the american people. he has to have a conversation with the american people and get them to see him as a president. >> has he? >> no he has not. >> why not? >> his convention speech he has run a personality campaign and nobody is going to out personality barack obama. >> for romney to just breakthrough what looks like an increasing race in which he has fewer chances to change the dynamics. obama has to just not make it and he wins. this is a tough situation for a challenger particularly on the first debate. the pressure is on domestic policy. and so this
f. kennedy and richard nixon squared off in the very first televised debate. while nixon was known for being a fierce debater on camera he looked nervous, sweating profusely under the hot camera lights, whereas kennedy looked calm, cool, collected. forces those that watched the debate, kennedy was the winner, but for those who listened to the debate on radio, they thought nixon won. in the end it was kennedy who won the presidential race. well, of course, humor can also have an affect on the debates. 1908 ronald reagan repeatedly attacked by president jimmy carter for his stance on health care, but reagan won fans with his response. check it out. >> governor reagan, again, typically is against such a proposal. >> governor, there you go again. >> all right. want to bring in presidential historian douglas brinkley. good to see you, as always. let's just start by seeing that moment. how significant was that between carter and reagan? >> oh, it was big. if you go back to 1980, you have jimmy carter, the sitting president, but he had double digit inflation, long gasoline lines, and iran
, another amazing recognition, 40 years ago the clean water act was signed by president richard nixon who was viewed as a conservative. there seemed to be a consensus protecting the environment was important. what's happened to the consensus. why is even the notion of global warming under attack by the republican party and those on the right? >> i think it is not politically expedient. i think you know, people on that side of the aisle probably have a lot to gain from the status quo. and changing things the way we need to isn't necessarily convenient. but the truth is you know, i don't understand it. i don't understand it. science has been rejected on so many counts and things like the clean water act which make sense. before the clean water act was passed, the quality of water was governed by each state individually. and it wasn't working. rivers were catching on fire. the clean water act was passed. there were federal regulations governing the quality of our water. and things got a lot better and now we want to
young president. he believes that as nixon went to beijing in 1972, he will go to tehran and make peace for the globe in a handshake with the supreme leader. that is his vision, larry. >> how realistic is that, john, in the last few moments here? that sounds to me like something way out of left field. >> it is. larry, it's not even in the ballpark, larry. this is a predatory regime and they only have one future. and that's off the planet. >> all right. so the threat goes on. john batchelor, thank you, my friend. we appreciate it very much. >>> yesterday it was spain, today greece, are violent pictures like these once again the norm in europe? and are the bailouts still coming or will they fall victim to the new violence. >>> coming up also, "2016" the movie, the ferocious attacks launched by the president, plus dirty tricks to suppress the high-grossing film. facing off live onset next on the "kudlow report." jack, you're a little boring. boring. boring. [ jack ] after lauren broke up with me, i went to the citi private pass page and decided to be...not boring. that's how i met marilyn.
out. >> i mean nixon and sparrow agnew perfected it in the '60s and '70s we're the pointy headed intellectuals and turned the notion of the elite being big business and those people that make the decisions those liberals who want to tell you how to live and where to send your children to school. >> you saw it with president obama where the first african-american president who has credentials, very much like every other president, ivy league education, all of that sort of thing, suddenly gets framed in this way that his intellectual accomplishments are inappropriate and instead what we saw was a kind of populism that emerged from the mccain and palin campaign in '08 to push back against that. we're seeing a renewal of that. >> mitt romney -- >> joint degrees from harvard. >> exactly. doesn't really match with this candidate but there's a way in which it emerges in '08. >> so used to using it. >> about the attacking academic credentials when you counted up in 2008 how often people's education was specifically cited in major newspaper articles, barack obama's time at harvard went ov
richard nixon a long time to come out of hiding. and i'm not sure that he ever came back and spoke at a convention. >> paul glastris, author of "elephant in the room," thank you so much for your time today. it sounds like a fascinating read. full disclosure here, i have only started it. they keep me pretty busy here, paul. hope to get around to the whole thing. >> hope you enjoy it. >> coming up, what beer you drink has to say about your politics. all of a sudden, the folks here on the floor have all perked up. >>> a little bit later, accusations politics in missouri have become unladylike. this is msnbc. [ male announcer ] let's say you need to take care of legal matters. wouldn't it be nice if there was an easier, less-expensive option than using a traditional lawyer? well, legalzoom came up with a better way. we took the best of the old and combined it with modern technology. together you get quality services on your terms, with total customer support. legalzoom documents have been accepted in all 50 states, and they're backed by a 100% satisfaction guarantee. so go to legalzoom
in missouri named jay nixon. he will be re-elected because he focuses on jobs. >> you are already holding that seat, though. it's the ones you might lose that are worrisome. >> akin is going to lose because of a demonstrated anti-woman policy that they have in the republican party where one month a senator says he will not endorse akin, and then the next month he says he will endorse him. >> what i said was that the national issues are big enough that we need to have a discussion of those issues rather than ones that todd managed to bring to the table. >>hich hopefully will be more favorable than the ones that he brought up. >> it's about the majority and let's see how todd does. >> senator blunt, governor o'malley, thank you. >>> governor romney steps up his attack on president obama's economy. is romney on the right path to get back in the race? [ male announcer ] this is rudy. his morning starts with arthritis pain. and two pills. afternoon's overhaul starts with more pain. more pills. triple checking hydraulics. the evening brings more pain. so, back to more pills. almost done, when..
and lost all the way going back to nixon and kennedy. often, it was a really good one liner that summedded up someone or it was a good rebuttal, and often, it was a gaffe. neil: do you think they change the outcome, though? i mean, if you look back at 1980, you could argue the momentum was beginning to go in ronald reagan's favor. you can argue in 1960, though the race was tight, people were open to a challenger. you're smarter than i'll ever be, pat, but does it change the outcome or confirm a trend? >> i think the 1980 debate did not change the outcome, but i think it -- reagan won. he was moving ahead. i think that's why carter wanted to debate, but that gave him a 10-point victory. i think that the
in vietnam consumed the bitter campaign battle between nixon and mcgovern. on october 26th, 12 days before the election, vietnam negotiator henry kiss jer made a surprise declaration. >> we believe that peace is at hand. >> it was the fird so-called october surprise. a late in the game campaign event with a significant impact on the election. >> in order to win reelection for nixon 1972, they needed to end the vietnam war. this was sort of the definitive statement. >> the most famous october surprise was in 1980 and the surprise was what did not happen. 52 u.s. hostages held in iran were not released before the election. despite president carter's efforts. instead, they were freed as soon as ronald reagan was inaugurated. setting off democratic suspicion never proven that reagan emissaries back channeled with ryan to delay freeing the hostages and denied the troubled carter campaign a huge pre-election boost. >> it fed into the whole dynamic of the 1980 race in the sense that jimmy carter was a stumbling, ineffective president. >> fast forward to 1992, president jhw bush was on the ropes a
that late september leads can evaporate by election day. in 1968 hubert humphrey was down 15 points. nixon won it was less than 1 percent. in 1976, jimmy carter had a 33-point lead over gerald ford. three debates, ford had cut the lead to 5 points and led in the final polls and narrowly lost. jamie carter had a consistent advantage over ronald reagan but the final presidential debate changed everything leading to a reagan landslide. now he is building a lead in key battleground states, a consultant who worked for jimmy carter, finding the right sample to survey can be tricky. >> we know from exit polls that republicans tend to respond to these polls less than oftentimes particularly to news organizations less than do democrats. >> reporter: in. >> julie: 8 there was a huge swing. dukakis lost to bush. in 1992 incumbent president was down nine points in mid-september and was tied with bill clinton by the end of october. the clinton eventually won. former clinton pollster is questioning the assumptions being made in today's polls. >> these polls are assuming that you have the same high level
. this is nixon's secret plan for years later. if they think they can cut tax rates and close these loopholes and expenditures, they have to name them. you have to be honest with the american people. they are being totally dishonest. somehow, they think that people will buy it. dagen: dishonest is a big word. mitt romney has alluded towards meeting to let congress -- this will be a comprehensive tax reform. >> if you do not tell the american people it darkly where you will get all of this revenue so you can get a tax break to everybody, and you are not preparing the way, not getting a mandate so once you are collected you can actually do something. will they get rid of the health deduction looks like yes or no. will they wipe out the retirement deductions? yes or no. they will not name a single name and i think it is a vindication of how far the republican party has gotten lost. we cannot afford any tax cuts. we have to deal with our deficit. that will mean spending cuts for everybody. dagen: is it a mistake to run on this at all? how can you focus been on, because the issue is growth and job
since richard nixon. paul ryan is telling local cincinnati news it is okay because the money creates jobs but there's little evidence that it does anything for job creation. politico is pointing out some sketchy budget math. in paul ryan's plan. he quietly cut half a percent from medicare's annual growth rate and while that doesn't sound like much, without that money, the house budget plan would be in the red. back with more bill. stay with us. (vo) what is said here could decide the election. current tv presents coverage of the presidential debate. with unrivaled analysis and commentary. >> you're going to hear that used as a major talking point. (vo) the only network with real-time reaction straight from the campaigns and from viewers like you. >>now that's politically direct. sir... excuse me, excuse me... can i get you to sign off on the johnson case... ♪ we built this city! ♪ don't let food hang around. ♪ on rock & roll! ♪ [ orbit trumpet plays ] clean it up with orbit! [ ding! ] fabulous! for a good clean feeling... eat. dri
with nixon it was about how he sweated. with george bush it was about looking at his watch. it's about someone's eye contact with the camera. but what this really still has to come down to is reminding voters what we're facing. and if we continue to import oil, and fund opec and send our soldiers to defend opec oil fields and lose our blood and treasure there, that's a concern. if we talk about the problems with china and the manipulating their currency and that affecting our manufacturing, that's a concern. it's about the cost of health care rising, about government's role in health care, those are concerns. and whoever looks nice in these things or talks nice doesn't matter so much as what the substance and the takeaway is. because the next morning people are still going to be concerned around their kitchen table, what affects american families. are their kids going to have a future? do they have jobs? is their economy growing -- >> i get that. but also, as you know, the whole point of televised debate, there is a measure of how did you look? how did you seem? did you seem presidenti
that first televised debate when americans saw kennedy and nixon on t.v. the second was the year 2000 when george bush overtook vice president al gore. as john mentioned earlier in the show that does not mean it is time to get complacent. one thing romney could have going for him is that the jobs report is out just 36 hours after the first debate. more john fugelsang coming up on the full court press and we're always live in chat, join us there, current.com/billpress. you're about to watch an ad message created by a current tv viewer for capella university. matter. i've been a nurse since 1979. i love being a nurse. a few years ago a friend i went to grade school with showed me a book she had kept from third grade. i had written that i wanted to be a nurse. after being a nurse for about twenty years i decided that i need to further my education. my masters degree was done completely online and that gave me the freedom and ability to do my education while i raised my kids and worked full time. raising my kids as a single mom and having them see me get my education online and work opportunit
it was a game changer when president kennedy debated richard nixon. same was true with ronald reagan when he debated jimmy carter. it can make a difference. mitt romney needs to come out and be very aggressive about the president's policies and his solutions. and i think he will do real good. >> we know they've been rehearsing zingers or we're told by a "new york times" report this morning that mitt romney has been practicing zingers. i guess practicing them on some of his aides as well. you just talked about substance. others have been focusing on, well, really it's the moments and the zingers that make the difference. which do you think it is? >> there has to be a sense throughout -- at the end of the debate, the viewer will have a sense as to who can be the better leader for the united states. and mitt romney has to come across as, well, he can do a better job leading the united states on domestic policies. so it's an impression that the viewer will get overall. it will be the zingers. but it will be really the impression. who can create the better impression of leadership and that person
political era for getting people like joe mccarthy and richard nixon. talk about the media establishment's view of eisenhower. >> the media establishment basically loved eisenhower. he was their friend. you read his private correspondence. he and the publisher of "time" were great buddies. a lot of time people working in the white house -- it was such a different age. it was not as adversarial. it was much more trusting. correspondents would come out over to the white house, have a few drinks a s with ike. he'd say stuff off the record. he even talked about recognizing china. imagine if that had leaked during the 1950s. it was just a different era. and ike was trustworthy. reporters also trusted him. >> also talk about ike the republican president that was willing to send troops to little rock. >> you know, he gets a lot of grief on civil rights. and it's true he did not use the bully pulpit. he could have done a better job on that. but he was a subtle guy. he desegregated d.c. when people weren't watching. he desegregated the armed services. it wasn't truman. he appointed all the federa
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)